How To Recover After A Marathon


How To Recover After A Marathon

Of course, training for a marathon is about physical endurance. But do you know all the nutritional requirements to reach the goal? We sat down with nutrition consultant Advisor Alyse Levine to get her opinion on how to recover after the race with the right nutritional options. Here, your expert vision.

Nutrition plays a key role in the training process for the marathon. Even with the perfect training program, runners will not be able to perform well during their careers if they do not feed and recharge energies properly.

Q: When people think of marathon training, they initially think about the physical training program and what it will entail. How important is nutrition in the training process for the marathon?

Q: When people think of marathon training, they initially think about the physical training program and what it will entail. How important is nutrition in the training process for the marathon?

Nutrition plays a key role in the training process for the marathon. Even with the perfect training program, runners will not be able to perform well during their careers if they do not feed and recharge energies properly. Proper nutrition will allow one to train longer and harder, delay fatigue and help the body recover faster after a race.

Q: What are your general nutritional recommendations for someone who is going to run a marathon or start training for the marathon?

As a runner's training distance increases, his need for calories increases, especially those from carbohydrates. The reason why carbohydrates are so important is that they are needed to load the muscles of glycogen, which is the main source of energy used during endurance exercise. In fact, at least between 55% and 65% of the general diet of a resistance runner should be carbohydrates. As for the remaining calories, 15% should come from lean proteins to help build and repair the muscle, and the rest of the calories should come from fats (to provide satiety and support structural and chemical processes normal body).

Runners should also try to tackle a diet rich in antioxidants that contain lots of fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains. Consuming a variety of fruits and vegetables will help athletes make sure they have a broad reservoir of antioxidants and phytochemicals (which can help improve recovery and overall health).Runners should also try to consume at least two servings of fatty fish a week due to the anti-inflammatory properties of their omega 3 content, which can help relieve muscle pain and increase immunity.

Q: Are there myths about the things that you should and should not eat during training for a marathon, which you can take advantage of to disprove?

Q: Are there myths about the things that you should and should not eat during training for a marathon, which you can take advantage of to disprove?

Myth # 1: Drink as much water as possible while running to avoid hypernatremia (high and dangerous concentration of sodium in the blood). In fact, drinking too much water can cause hyponatremia, which is an imbalance in the levels of fluid and electrolytes in the blood. Basically, sodium levels in the blood fall precipitously due to excessive fluid intake (and if not treated properly, this condition could lead to death). To ensure that runners do not drink excess water, they should be weighed before and after the races, and make sure they do not have weight gain from excessive fluid intake. Try to drink just enough to replace lost fluids and consume sports drinks that contain sodium instead of just water. After the race, runners should weigh within 2% greater than their previous weight, and no more. They should also try to drink between 16 to 32 ounces of fluid for each race hour.

Myth # 2: You must load up on carbohydrates before a marathon or a long run. In fact, instead of filling up with pasta dishes the night before a long race (which can cause digestive problems or make them feel slow or tired during the race), runners should consume their usual diet rich in carbohydrates and focus on reducing physical activity during the week before the race to maximize glycogen stores. A coach can provide specific distance points that must be followed in preparation for the marathon day.

Myth # 3: "I'm running so much that I can eat what I want and I do not gain weight." If you are using long runs as an excuse to stuff yourself with whatever you want, do not be surprised if you start to get fat slowly. A 10-mile race can easily be undone with a Mexican fast-food bean and cheese burrito, for example (about 1000 calories). Although your caloric needs increase as your mileage increases, use your level of hunger as an indicator of how much you should eat, and not your eyes. Add more calories through healthy foods, preferably around your workouts, and not in the form of treats allowed late at night, as it will not help with recovery.

Myth # 4: Energy bars and gels are much better at charging energy than real food.Although energy bars and gels are convenient, there is nothing special about them that can not be obtained from ordinary foods. For example, instead of spending extra money on gels, you can make yours by diluting a little jelly and putting it in a small airtight bag. Instead of an energy bar, you can make your own mix or eat some Fig Newtons, or pretzels with peanut butter. Either way, you will get the nutrients you need to nourish your body in long races. As for the special recovery drinks for after the races, a good milk chocolate works just as well.

Myth # 5: You do not need to consume fats during training for a marathon, your diet should consist, mostly, of carbohydrates with some lean protein. Fats are an essential component of any diet. They provide fat-soluble vitamins and fatty acids, generate a concentrated source of energy, are necessary to protect vital organs, are used for isolation, are components of cell membranes, improve the taste and smell of food and increase the feeling of fullness of the food. The consumption of fats should not fall below 15% of the daily caloric intake, since doing so hinders performance and health.

Q: Can you tell us a little more about the new conclusions about cherry juice? What does it do and how should it be incorporated into a broker's diet?

A growing body of research continues to support the consumption of sour cherry juice for its anti-inflammatory and pain relief benefits. For example, research from the Oregon Health and Science University revealed that runners who drank cherry juice twice a day for seven days before and on the day of a long run had significantly less muscle pain after the race than the runners. They drank another fruit juice. On the other hand, a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, "Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise" suggests that cherry juice a day reduces the muscle damage caused by exercise.

Researchers believe that the post-exercise benefits of cherries are probably "due to the natural anti-inflammatory properties of the fruit (by the antioxidant compounds called anthocyanins, which also give their bright red color to the cherry). Cherry juice is extremely easy to incorporate into the diet of a runner, since it is available all year round and can be poured into smoothies or simply consume pure.The research on cherry juice supports its role in reducing pain and muscle swelling when consumed before racing, but it is also an excellent option for recovery after races.You can also take advantage of the benefits of cherries in their fresh, frozen or dried forms.

Q: What should runners use immediately after the race to help them recover optimally?

Alyse's choices for snacks after running

Homemade Muesli: mix dried cherries, pretzels, nuts and cereals, and stir with a low-fat yogurt, or enjoy a handful.

Chocolate milk: This snack is cold, refreshing and easy to swallow if you do not want solid foods; milk is 90% water, so you are rehydrating at the same time. A good portion is 16 fluid ounces.

Peanut Butter Banana: Try individual peanut butter packages (Justin's Nut Butters are organic and portable) spread on a large banana; both come wrapped in individual packages, so they are comfortable to wear.

Bagel with Hummus: Bagels are good replenishment foods for runners, as they are a rich source of carbohydrates, with a bit of protein, and are easy to digest after a long run. By adding a little hummus you will increase the protein in the snack to help the muscles recover more quickly.

Cherry Blend: Mix 1 cup of fat-free vanilla yogurt, 1 ripe banana, 1/2 cup of orange juice, 1/4 cup of sour cherry juice and 1 cup of crushed ice and keep it on your vehicle, as a snack for energy replenishment after running.

Video Tutorial: 5 Things to do the Day After a Marathon.

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